AlbertaChickensEtc

Canadian Poultry Forum Chickens, Eggs, Cattle, Goats, Sheep, Horses, Pets - Across Canada For Sale And Want Ads Forum - Register - Login - And Come On In - Post Your Ad Or Just Chat! image

You are not logged in.

Announcement

A.C.E. Now Has Over THREE THOUSAND Members across Canada! Find Your Province And Say Hello To Us! ALL MEMBERS ARE TO INCLUDE THEIR LOCATION IN THEIR PROFILE .... CLICK ON "PROFILE" ON THE TOP BLUE BAR THEN CLICK ON "PERSONAL" image PRIVATE MESSAGING AND USER LIST WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE TO NEW MEMBERS UNTIL THEIR STATUS BECOMES GROWING MEMBER.

#1 2017-07-17 18:52:11

shaneb99
I Love A.C.E.
From: Strathmore
Registered: 2012-08-28
Posts: 1722

Hatching male/female ratio

I hatched 27 of my Silver Laced Brahmas of which 9 are too young to sex definitively. Of the older 18 only 6 are pullets, 12 are cockerals.  I wish I knew what determined it because last year I had more males than females too although not quite as disproportionate. Maybe it will balance out on the younger ones.


Feather Feet - Light, Dark, Buff, Blue & Silver Laced Brahmas. And a whole bunch of other stuff plus 2 Akbash Maremma guardians who keep watch and a very patient wife who tries to keep me grounded.

Offline

 

#2 2017-07-17 23:15:12

yardbirds
Administrator
From: just north of Yorkton, Sk
Registered: 2011-08-02
Posts: 9439

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

I only had one hatch of 8 barred rock chicks....2 cockerels and 6 pullets.... :D  Unfortunately,  I didn't keep any of them.  Sold 5 and 3 went out to a friend on the farm.


Soldier of Tolerance

[ If you consider yourself a "gift" to all you share your life with....I promise you will always give your best.... ]

Offline

 

#3 2017-07-18 01:46:40

Ipf
I Love A.C.E.
From: Salt Spring Island
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1631

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

If there were an easy way of influencing the sex ratio, you know the factory farm folks would have got it figured out by now. With small samples sizes, it comes down to a simple binomial distribution. It's only with large numbers that we can reasonably expect the ratio to be about 50:50.

Online

 

#4 2017-07-18 02:34:52

Shnookie
A.C.E. Addicted
From: Regina, Saskatchewan
Registered: 2013-04-19
Posts: 701

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

I have read that the hen determines the sex of the chicks.  This makes me think that if you have a hen that produces lots of pullets that you would want to use her and them for breeding. I bred my EO hen to my Ameraucana rooster last year.  I incubated 6 eggs.  All 6 eggs hatched.  3 were male and 3 were female.  I bred that hen to a different rooster this year.  I incubated 4 eggs.  All 4 eggs hatched and all are male.  I incubated 7 more eggs from this mating.  3 hatched.  I don't know the sex yet.  I think it's the luck of the draw.


Starting with Blue, Black, and Splash Ameraucanas and Red Cuckoo Basque (Marraduna).

Offline

 

#5 2017-07-18 02:41:55

Ipf
I Love A.C.E.
From: Salt Spring Island
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1631

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

The hen "determines" the chick's sex in the same way that male mammals "determine" a baby's sex. They contribute the sex chromosome, and it's generally assumed that the contribution is random. The female bird has one female (W) and one male (Z) chromosome, and there's a 50:50 chance for either. Males have two Z chromosomes, so always contribute a Z.

Online

 

#6 2017-07-18 14:00:50

Fowler
I Love A.C.E.
From: New Brunswick
Registered: 2009-01-14
Posts: 5043

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

I know it's supposed to be random but I sure doesn't feel random sometimes.  When I was hatching, I had a hard time building up my Mille Fleur hens for several years.  Then, suddenly, my numbers evened out.


Black Ameraucana

Offline

 

#7 2017-07-18 22:28:42

shaneb99
I Love A.C.E.
From: Strathmore
Registered: 2012-08-28
Posts: 1722

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

Like Ipf says, the hen contributes either a W or Z chromosome. However I don't think it's necessarily 50:50.  There may be times when hen has a predisposition to give more Z chromosomes say if the rooster to hen ratio is low. The hen may be more likely to provide a male chromosome to insure more males are born to protect the species. I don't know, just speculation.


Feather Feet - Light, Dark, Buff, Blue & Silver Laced Brahmas. And a whole bunch of other stuff plus 2 Akbash Maremma guardians who keep watch and a very patient wife who tries to keep me grounded.

Offline

 

#8 2017-07-19 00:07:07

Ipf
I Love A.C.E.
From: Salt Spring Island
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1631

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

Yeah, well, there are sporadic research results over the decades suggesting wrinkles on the theme (just as there are for people). But for all practical barnyard purposes, I think it's pretty safe to assume it's in the neighborhood of 50:50.

Online

 

#9 2017-07-19 04:55:58

Schipperkesue
Administrator
From: Carnwood, Alberta
Registered: 2010-04-08
Posts: 15263

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

Statistically you would approach a 50:50 ratio the more you hatch but with low numbers (under 1000ish) you may see more of one sex or the other.

Each egg has a 50% chance of producing male or female, but when you hatch low numbers your overall percent may not be 50%


Embrace your mistakes....they are life's most meaningful education.

Offline

 

#10 2017-07-20 03:07:22

OC
Growing Member
From: Ontario
Registered: 2014-08-12
Posts: 35

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

Unless you have 100% hatch, I suspect the ratio tends to favor males because they are more likely to survive less then perfect incubating conditions, since they tent to be stronger then females.

Offline

 

#11 2017-07-20 04:32:10

shaneb99
I Love A.C.E.
From: Strathmore
Registered: 2012-08-28
Posts: 1722

Re: Hatching male/female ratio

Doing a bit of reading on this and apparently in birds there is some bias depending on the situation. For instance :
"In the group of fancy-bred chickens, the primary sex ratio was significantly biased toward more males and dependent on the laying sequence. Our data suggested a sex ratio bias toward males in the very first eggs at onset of reproduction in chickens depending on genetic background."
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18030680

"There is ample evidence that birds have the ability to adjust their offsprings’ sex ratios before fertilization occurs. Recent work has focused on pinpointing when during the process of oocyte maturation adjustment of sex ratio takes place."
https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/53 … ustment-of

"Biases in avian sex ratios have been documented in relation to a variety of social and
environmental conditions. Previous studies suggest that treatment with hormones can
stimulate females to manipulate offspring sex, and that this effect occurs before ovulation. "
Elevated testosterone during meiotic segregation stimulates laying hens to produce more sons than daughters


Feather Feet - Light, Dark, Buff, Blue & Silver Laced Brahmas. And a whole bunch of other stuff plus 2 Akbash Maremma guardians who keep watch and a very patient wife who tries to keep me grounded.

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB
Hosted by PunBB-Hosting